Institute of Sacred Arts at St Vladimir’s Seminary Launches New Website

SVOTS – 13/4/2020

[SVOTS Communications / YONKERS, NY] “Airy and spacious and inviting.” The description of a painting? Actually, it is one of the ways that the newly launched website (www.instituteofsacredarts.com) of the Institute of Sacred Arts (ISA) at St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary has been described. This new home for the Institute, whose mission is to “explore the intersection of human creativity and holiness” has many features to help the viewer understand the mutual relationship between theology and the arts.

“I wanted the website to convey that there is exciting activity happening at St. Vladimir’s regarding the arts,” said Institute Director and St. Vladimir’s Professor Dr. Peter Bouteneff. “The website features a lot of material coming out of our events surrounding music, visual arts, liturgy, with a lot of exciting video content,” he said.

The site also includes textual reflections from Seminary and external faculty. A recently featured reflection was on the theological implications of a popular KPOP video.

Viewers will want to stay current with the site to find out the latest about the Institute’s upcoming events, including next June’s Pan-Orthodox Music Symposium.

About the ISA
The Institute of Sacred Arts at St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary explores the intersection of human creativity and holiness. With a theology that is holistic and a liturgy that unites multiple artistic disciplines and all the human senses, the Orthodox Christian tradition is ripe for the exploration and celebration of the sacred arts. Since its founding in 1938, St. Vladimir’s Seminary has fostered the study of icons, music, and liturgy. The Institute of Sacred Arts serves to extend the seminary’s mission in exploring the mutual relationship between theology and the arts by contributing to the work of people and institutions that practice and reflect on the sacred arts; engaging people and institutions of all backgrounds with Orthodox artistic tradition; inspiring wider public interest in spirituality and the arts.

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