Sadilovac Orthodox Martyrs

by Orthodoxy Cognate PAGE on August 15, 2017

in Featured, Featured News, News

Croatian Nazi soldiers kill a Serb with a dagger and bayonet. Independent State of Croatia, WW II

Croatian Nazi soldiers kill a Serb with a dagger and bayonet.
Independent State of Croatia, WW II

Memorial plaque with names of the victims in the church of the Birth of the Most Holy Theotokos in the Sadilovac village of Kordun, today in Croatia.

Memorial plaque with names of the victims in the church of the Birth of the Most Holy Theotokos in the Sadilovac village of Kordun, today in Croatia.

Mighty Nose – Grey Carter – July – August 2017

On 31 July 1942, the Ustasha criminals murdered and set fire killing 463 men, women and children (of which 149 were under the age of 13) from Sadilovac, Bugari, Lipovacha and nearby villages.

The only ‘sin’ of the victims was that they were Orthodox Serbs. In these horrible crimes during the Second World War, about 70% of the population of the Kordun region was ethnically cleansed. Dozens of predominately-Serbian Orthodox villages cease to exist.

When the Second World War started, the village Sadilovac had a population of 800. Only 40 Sadilovci residents survived to see the liberation in 1945.

Five years after modern Croatia illegally seceded from Yugoslavia, they re – adopted their Nazi flag, anthem and ideology of pro-fascism, including persecution and ethnic cleaning of Serbs in the worst tradition of their Nazi predecessors. During the criminal ‘Operation Storm’ in 1995, the village collapsed completely.

The inhabitants were murdered and wiped out, meanwhile their properties looted and destroyed, and the land taken over by the state of Croatia.

Today, there are no Serbs living in the area.

Source:

  • TomD

    Is there an online version of the plaque available?

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