Armenia Will Never Give Up Fight to Get Turkey to Recognize Genocide

© AFP 2016/ KAREN MINASYAN

© AFP 2016/ KAREN MINASYAN

Armenian civilians escorted by Ottoman soldiers, being marched to a prison in southeastern Turkish city of Elazig, April 1915. © AP PHOTO

Armenian civilians escorted by Ottoman soldiers, being marched to a prison in southeastern Turkish city of Elazig, April 1915. © AP PHOTO

www.sputniknews.com – April 2016

Commemorating the 101st anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, Armenian officials said that Yerevan will continue to push for the international recognition of the Armenian Genocide, and for the restoration of truth and justice over the Turkish crime that resulted in the deaths of over 1.5 million civilians, the expulsion of over half-a-million more.

The Armenian leadership, including President Serzh Sargsyan and Prime Minister Hovik Abrahamyan, flanked by religious leaders and foreign guests, gathered at the Tsitsernakaberd memorial complex in Yerevan on Sunday to commemorate the 101st anniversary of the Armenian Genocide.

​Speaking to reporters on Sunday after paying tribute to the victims, Prime Minister Hovik Abrahamyan said that Armenia will continue to fight for the restoration of justice, emphasizing that “Turkish authorities must recognize the Armenian Genocide, the 101st anniversary of which we marked today.”

“The sooner the Turkish leadership thinks about accepting the truth, the better. The world also has work to do regarding this issue,” he added.

“It was the first genocide of the 20th century, and needs to be condemned by the whole world. This is the only way for the struggle of preventing genocides. We, by condemning this crime and commemorating the memory of the victims, must build our motherland in the future, as well as Nagorno-Karabakh, the second Armenian Republic.”

“The process will be considered done when the Turkish leadership and Turkish people accept the genocide committed by their ancestors,” Abrahamyan said.

​The Armenian Genocide has been recognized by over two dozen countries, including Russia. A century ago, together with France and Britain, Russia plainly called the events “a crime against humanity and civilization.”

Numerous ceremonies are being held in Moscow and in other Russian cities to commemorate the sad occasion, with many of Russia’s large Armenian community of three million participating.